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Faculty Fellows and Research Affiliates 2017-18: Biographical Sketches

Jacob Bowers
Jake Bowers
Political Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Jake Bowers, a research affiliate at CASBS, will lead activities to enhance the role of social and behavioral scientists in policy innovation and evaluation. He will convene meetings of teams of people within universities and people within governments to deepen existing collaborations, develop shared languages and standards for scientific integrity and causal inference, improve specific projects via design critiques, create coordinated multi-government experiments, and nurture cross-government networks. He will also be writing a review of the state of work in evidence-based policy and will help the CASBS evidence-based policy effort in general.

He is an associate professor of political science and statistics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was a fellow with the White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team, and is a fellow with the Office of Evaluation Sciences.

Visit the following websites for more information: http://jakebowers.org, http://sbst.gov, and http://oes.gsa.gov.

Raj Chetty
Raj Chetty
Economics
Stanford University

Raj Chetty, a CASBS faculty fellow, is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University. Chetty's research combines empirical evidence and economic theory to help design more effective government policies. His work on tax policy, unemployment insurance, and education has been widely cited in media outlets and Congressional testimony. His current research focuses on equality of opportunity: how can we give children from disadvantaged backgrounds better chances of succeeding? Chetty is co-coordinating a project on equality with David Grusky.

Chetty is a recipient of a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship and the John Bates Clark medal, given by the American Economic Association to the best American economist under age 40. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2003 at the age of 23 and was a professor at UC-Berkeley until 2009, when he returned to Harvard as one of the youngest tenured professors in Harvard's history. Chetty moved to the Department of Economics at Stanford in 2015.

Robert Gibbons
Robert Gibbons
Economics
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Robert Gibbons, a research affiliate at CASBS,  is Sloan Distinguished Professor of Management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management and professor in MIT’s department of economics. His research and teaching concern the design and performance of organized activities, especially “relational contracts” (informal agreements so rooted in the parties’ circumstances that they cannot be adjudicated by courts). Organized activities may occur not only within firms, but also between firms (e.g., supply relationships, alliances, joint ventures) or beyond firms (e.g., hospitals, schools, government agencies).

Since 2002, Gibbons has been co-principal investigator of MIT Sloan’s Program on Innovation in Markets and Organizations and founding director of the working group in organizational economics at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was co-editor (with John Roberts) of The Handbook of Organizational Economics (Princeton University Press, 2013) and a board member of the Citicorp Behavioral Science Research Council and of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

Since 2016, Gibbons and Woody Powell (Stanford University) have co-run a summer institute at CASBS on organizations and their effectiveness. As research affiliates in 2017-18, they will engage interested fellows with summer scholars who return for short stints at CASBS. Gibbons was a CASBS fellow in 1994-95 and 2014-15.

David B. Grusky
David B. Grusky
Sociology
Stanford University

David Grusky is a CASBS faculty fellow. His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and takes on such topics as the role of market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, recent trends in economic and social mobility, technology-based approaches to reducing poverty, the surprising persistence of extreme gender inequality, and new ways to improve the country’s infrastructure for monitoring poverty, inequality, and mobility.  He is co-coordinating a project on equality with Raj Chetty.

At Stanford University, Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, professor of sociology, senior fellow of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. Grusky is a former CASBS fellow (class of 1991-92).

Daniel E. Ho
Daniel E. Ho
Law
Stanford University

Daniel E. Ho, a faculty fellow at CASBS, will participate in CASBS’s evidence-based policymaking initiative, with a particular focus on facilitating rigorous collaborations between academics and government agencies.

Ho is the William Benjamin Scott and Luna M. Scott Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.  His scholarship centers on quantitative empirical legal studies, with a substantive focus on administrative law, antidiscrimination law, and courts.  Most recently, he worked with the public health department in Seattle and King County to improve the accuracy and consistency of regulatory enforcement in a trial of a peer review program and developed a randomized policy evaluation of the effects of food sanitation disclosures on health outcomes.  He received his J.D. from Yale Law School and his Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University.

Roberta R. Katz
Anthropology
Stanford University

Roberta Katz, a senior research scholar at CASBS, coordinates an interdisciplinary set of scholars who are examining the cultural norms and values of those born during and after the mid-1990s, an age group that has been denominated “Generation Z.”  The research will look closely at the traits that define the Generation Z culture, both in and outside the United States, and at the historical trends that have influenced the enculturation of members of this group.

Katz holds a PhD in anthropology as well as a law degree, and was previously the General Counsel of McCaw Cellular Corporation (now AT&T Wireless) and then of Netscape Corporation. For the past thirteen years, she has served under Stanford University Presidents John Hennessy and Marc Tessier-Lavigne as the associate vice president for strategic planning at Stanford. She also served as President Tessier-Lavigne’s interim chief of staff until early 2017. Katz has been deeply involved in the facilitation of a variety of interdisciplinary research initiatives at Stanford, and she is a current member of the CASBS board of directors.

Eric Klinenberg
Eric Klinenberg
Sociology
New York University

Eric Klinenberg will return to CASBS as a research affiliate (previously a fellow in 2007-08 and 2016-17) to develop a new program on the social science of climate change, with a focus on mitigation and adaptation in an urban context. Klinenberg is professor of sociology and director of the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University, as well as research director of the federal government’s Rebuild by Design competition. He is the author of Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone (Penguin, 2013), Fighting for Air (Holt, 2008), Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago (Chicago, 2nd ed., 2015), and, with Aziz Ansari, of Modern Romance (Penguin, 2015). He is also the editor of Climate Change and the Future of Cities (Duke, 2016).

In addition to his scholarly work, Klinenberg has contributed to The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, Le Monde Diplomatique, The London Review of Books, and the radio program, This American Life.

Arnold Milstein
Arnold Milstein
Medicine
Stanford University

Arnold Milstein, a CASBS faculty fellow, is a professor of medicine at Stanford University and directs the University’s Clinical Excellence Research Center. The Center engages faculty from health, computer, and social sciences in the discovery and replication of innovative health care delivery methods that safely lower per capita health care spending for excellent care.

Before joining Stanford’s faculty, his career of applied research spanned private and public sector healthcare delivery and policy. After creating a healthcare performance improvement firm that he expanded globally following its acquisition by Mercer, he co-founded three nationally influential public benefit initiatives, the Leapfrog Group in partnership with the Business Roundtable in 1998, and the Consumer Purchaser Alliance in 2001. Appointed to consecutive term as a Congressional MedPAC Commissioner, he originated two subsequently enacted legislative changes to improve the value of healthcare. He was a founding staff member and serves as the Medical Director of the Pacific Business Group on Health (PBGH), the largest employer-led regional healthcare improvement coalition in the U.S.

Citing his national impact on innovation in health care policy and delivery methods, he was selected for the highest annual award of both the National Business Group on Health (NBGH) and of the American College of Medical Quality. Elected to the Institute of Medicine (now, NAM) of the National Academy of Sciences, he chaired the planning committee of its workshop series on best methods to lower per capita health care spending and improve clinical outcomes. He was educated at Harvard University (BA in economics), Tufts University (MD) and the University of California, Berkeley (MPH in Healthcare Evaluation).

Josiah Ober
Josiah Ober
Classics and Political Science
Stanford University

Josiah Ober (CASBS fellow, 2004–05 and CASBS board member, 2014-17) is returning as a CASBS faculty fellow in 2017-18. Ober holds the Constantine Mitsotakis Chair in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, where he divides his time and academic appointment between the Departments of Classics and Political Science. He teaches courses on topics conjoining history, classical philosophy, political theory, social institutions, and political behavior.

Before coming to Stanford, Ober taught at Princeton University (1990-2006) and at Montana State University (1980-1990). His academic work focuses on the history, theory, and practice of self-governing organizations (ancient and modern), on the circulation of social and technical knowledge in democratic societies, and on the interplay between political philosophy and culture. He is author of a number of books, including, recently, Demopolis: Democracy before Liberalism in Theory and Practice (2017), The Rise and Fall of Classical Greece (2015), and Democratic Knowledge: Innovation and Learning in Classical Athens (2008).

He is currently working on projects on ancient and modern urbanization (with reference to comparative political and economic development), and on ancient Greek theories of rational decision-making and collective action. A recent interview, focusing on his work on Greek history and political thought can be found here: https://blog.lareviewofbooks.org/interviews/two-way-street-talking-josiah-ober/

Woody Powell
Sociology
Stanford University

Woody Powell, a CASBS faculty fellow, was a fellow at CASBS in 1986-87 and 2008-09, and with Bob Gibbons has been organizing the CASBS summer institute on organizations and their effectiveness. Powell will be working on two essays for a book in progress, one on the changing contours of the public, private, and nonprofit sectors, both in the US and globally, and the other on the new landscape of philanthropy and its associated private influence over public life. He is also launching, with a host of colleagues, a comparative cities project — studying the ecology of nongovernmental organizations through a comparison of large samples of nongovernmental organizations in the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, Vienna, Austria, and Shenzhen, China.

Powell is a professor of education (and) sociology, organizational behavior, management science and engineering, and communication at Stanford University. He has been faculty co-director of the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society since it was founded in 2006. He is also Centennial Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and the Lewis A. Coser Visiting Professor at the Hertie School of Governance. His general interests focus on the processes through which ideas and practices are transferred across organizations, and the role of networks in facilitating or hindering innovation.

Noelle Stout
Noelle Stout
Anthropology
New York University

Noelle Stout will return to CASBS as a research affiliate (she was a fellow at CASBS in 2016-17) to study the human impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning, focusing on questions of worker displacement and the implicit gendered dynamics of automation and robotics. Collaborating on the CASBS Catalyst research network, Stout will help to bring together scholars, industry professionals, and community stakeholders in the Silicon Valley to probe the groundbreaking potential, as well as the pitfalls, of rapidly developing AI technologies.

Stout’s ongoing research focuses on the interplay of major economic transformations and the micropolitics of daily life. Her forthcoming book, Dispossessed: How Predatory Bureaucracy Foreclosed on the American Middle Class (UC Press) traces the pernicious afterlife of the 2008 mortgage crash. Stout’s previous research analyzed the cultural consequences of introducing market-based tourism to Cuba, resulting in an award-winning book, After Love: Queer Intimacy and Erotic Economies in Post-Soviet Cuba (Duke, 2014) and a prize-winning documentary Luchando (2008), which has circulated internationally.

Stout is an associate professor of anthropology at New York University. Her research has won support from the National Science Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Furman Center for Real Estate and Public Policy, among others. She earned her BAS and MA in anthropology and feminist studies from Stanford University and a PhD in anthropology from Harvard University.

Abraham Verghese
Abraham Verghese
Medicine
Stanford University

Abraham Verghese, a CASBS faculty fellow, plans to develop the social science dimensions of Presence, a multidisciplinary project housed at Stanford’s School of Medicine that supports research aimed at better understanding the human experience of patients, physicians and caregivers and how it relates to medical error and outcomes. Presence addresses an era when technology, as much as it aids, also threatens to overwhelm the human side of medicine. Through collaboration with CASBS fellows, Verghese will explore these issues using insights from sociology, psychology, political science, organizational economics, and other disciplines that historically have honed their cutting edge at the Center.

Verghese’s career combines the roles of physician, teacher, and author with frequent bylines in newspapers and magazines across the world. More recently, he has been in demand as a TED speaker. Verghese is also a regular focus of attention in media — both medical and general — ranging from National Public Radio, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the New York Times to The Guardian and The Times of India. He is the author of the critically acclaimed novel Cutting for Stone (Knopf, 2009).

At Stanford’s School of Medicine, Verghese is the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, and Vice Chair for the Theory and Practice of Medicine. He is a physician trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, and in September 2016, Verghese received the National Humanities Medal from former President Obama.

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