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Published Work in the CASBS-Public Books Partnership

Dec 21 2020

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Featured Stories, In the News

The CASBS partnership, launched and announced in fall 2019, is all about books and ghosts that reside on the Center’s hilltop campus. In terms of books, it places a spotlight on select classics as well as recent accessions to the Center’s renowned Ralph W. Tyler Collection.* In terms of ghosts, current fellows reflect upon impactful and inspiring “Ghosts in the Study” – former fellows who occupied their offices (called studies at CASBS) at some point since the Center’s 1954-55 inaugural year.

View all installments in the partnership here.

Recent Accessions to the Tyler Collection

These take the form of author interviews.

  • Neta Alexander engages Margaret O’Mara, who initiated work on her latest book, The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America (2019), as a 2014-15 CASBS fellow. Interview here.
     
  • Emma Chubb engages Patricia Banks, who completed her latest book, Diversity and Philanthropy at African American Museums: Black Renaissance (2019), as a 2018-19 CASBS fellow. Interview here.
     
  • Paul DiMaggio (CASBS fellow 1984-85) engages form Pulitzer Prize winner Paul Starr, who worked on his latest book, Entrenchment: Wealth, Power, and the Constitution of Democratic Societies (2019), as a 2014-15 CASBS fellow. Interview here.

 

Tyler Collection Classics

Scholars reflect upon the enduring significance and intellectual impact of a classic book in the collection. Publication anniversaries often motivate the essays.

  • Jeremy Adelson reflects on the enduring legacy of Albert Hirschman’s Exit, Voice, and Loyalty: Responses to Decline in Firms, Organizations, and States (1970). Hirschman wrote the book as a 1968-69 CASBS fellow. Essay here.
     
  • Harvey Molotch (CASBS fellow 1999-2000) reflects on the importance of Stanley Lieberson’s A Matter of Taste: How Names, Fashions, and Culture Change (2000). Lieberson wrote the book as a 1995-96 CASBS fellow. Essay here.

 

Ghosts in the Study

CASBS fellows discuss prominent former CASBS fellows who occupied their studies, including the intellectual impact the former fellows have had on their work or their lasting importance for the field/social science at large.

  • Catherine Ramírez (CASBS fellow 2019-20) writes on the meaning of assimilation while reflecting upon two ghosts who previously occupied her study (#51) – Alejandro Portes (1980-81) and Samuel Huntington (1969-70). Essay here.

     
  • Rene Almeling (CASBS fellow 2019-20) explores the relationship between scientific knowledge and social inequalities while paying tribute to a ghost who previously occupied her study (#38) – Evelyn Fox Keller (1991-92). Essay here.

 

*Thousands of scholarly articles and nearly 2,000 books have been initiated, drafted, worked upon, or completed by fellows at the Center. Many are classic, foundational works that exert significant influence on academic discourse, contemporary thought, and public policy – influence that often reverberates across decades. The books reside in the Center’s Ralph W. Tyler Collection. Explore the entire collection here and view recent entries to the collection here.