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Fellows 2017-18: Biographical Sketches

John Ahlquist
John Ahlquist
Political Science
University of California, San Diego

Two projects will fill John Ahlquist’s fellowship year, both of which concern policies designed to help citizens share and mitigate the risk of economic hardship. The first builds on Ahlquist’s ongoing participation in CASBS’ working group on the Future of Work: how do annuity policies — open-ended promises of government benefits to some set of people — become credible in the eyes of recipients? During the fellowship year he will develop a behavioral measure of policy credibility and then design experimental tools able to establish what affects the credibility of annuity policies.

The second project continues Ahlquist’s existing work that uses experimental tools to examine how traditional social insurance and welfare policies affect behavior and how political preferences around such programs emerge. One such experiment tests whether insurance generosity induces people to acquire more task-specific skills. Another attempts to discover whether people will actively give up a direct personal benefit to prevent another person deemed “undeserving” from accessing a similar benefit.

Ahlquist is a political economist and an associate professor in the School of Global Policy and Strategy at the University of California, San Diego. His work looks at how advanced capitalism and democratic government reinforce or undermine one another, with a special focus on distributional conflict and the political mobilization of wage earners. He has a BA from the University of California, Berkeley and a PhD from the University of Washington.

Learn more about Ahlquist’s work here: http://johnahlquist.net/.

Shahzeen Attari
Shahzeen Attari
Environmental Science and Psychology
Indiana University

Shahzeen Attari works on environmental decision making at the individual level. Her research focuses on biases that shape people’s judgments and decisions about resource use, especially use of energy and water. During her fellowship, Attari will explore the following question: does the coupling of facts (related to systems thinking) and feelings (related to emotional scaffolding) lead to increased understanding and value of the water system? She wants to create a theory that explains when and why facts and feelings in isolation or together matter most for invoking action across different environmental contexts.

Attari earned a BS in engineering physics from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a PhD in civil and environmental engineering & engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. She was a postdoctoral fellow at the Earth Institute and the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University. She is currently an assistant professor at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Learn more about Attari’s work by visiting her website: www.szattari.com.

Carrie Cihak
Carrie S. Cihak
Chief of Policy
Office of King County (Seattle, Washington) Executive Dow Constantine

During her fellowship year, Carrie Cihak will focus on three inter-related components to advance evidence-based policymaking. She will: 1) develop practices to support sustained and meaningful collaboration between academic researchers and governments; 2) explore the science and evidence-base of belonging and social engagement with an eye toward what government can do to support it; and 3) will advance evidence-based partnerships with academic institutions such as Stanford’s Center on Longevity.

As Chief of Policy for the highest-ranking elected official of the 13th largest county in the United States, Cihak is responsible for identifying the highest priority policy areas and community outcomes for leadership focus and for developing and launching innovative solutions to issues that are complex, controversial and cross-sectoral. She is an architect of some of the administration’s key initiatives such as Best Starts for Kids and the County’s nationally-recognized work on equity and social justice. Prior to her work in Executive Constantine’s administration, Cihak served for eight years as a senior-level analyst for the King County Council and as lead staff for the King County Board of Health. She is trained as a PhD-level (ABD — University of Michigan) economist specializing in Japan, and served as staff economist on international trade and finance for President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers.

Shelley Clark
Shelley Clark
Sociology
McGill University

During her fellowship, Shelley Clark will examine whether access to day care improves the health and economic welfare of women and children in sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing primarily on data from her recently completed randomized intervention study in Korogocho, a slum area of Nairobi, Kenya, she will test whether providing free day care is an effective strategy to increase women’s labor force participation and income. In addition, her work will assess the impact of quality of day care on children’s cognitive development and health.

Clark’s research frequently employs a life course perspective to explore how adolescents can make successful transitions to adulthood, particularly in countries with sustained HIV/AIDS epidemics, and how family instability and single motherhood shape the health and life trajectories of children and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa.

Clark is a James McGill Professor of Sociology and director of the Centre on Population Dynamics at McGill University. From 2007 to 2017, she held a Canada Research Chair in Youth, Gender, and Global Health. After receiving her BA from the University of Virginia, she completed her PhD in public and international affairs at Princeton University.

Learn more about Clark’s work here: http://www.mcgill.ca/sociology/faculty/clark.

Jennifer Crocker
Psychology
Ohio State University

Jennifer Crocker will spend her fellowship year working on two related projects. She will analyze and write up the results of the first study of the effects of mental health stigma and social motivation on college roommate relationship dynamics over time, providing insight into how stigma results in negative outcomes for students who begin college with a diagnosis of anxiety or depression, and what factors protect against negative outcomes — information critically needed to design effective interventions. She will also write a broader theory paper on the interaction of egosystem and ecosystem social motivations and how they shape interpersonal relationships, health, and psychological well-being.

Crocker’s research falls at the interface of the self, stigma, social motivation, and close relationships. Using a variety of research methods, her work explores how these two evolved motivational systems shape people’s construals of their social worlds, their social interactions, and the consequences of these processes for relationships and psychological well-being over time. 

Crocker is Ohio Eminent Scholar in Social Psychology and professor of psychology at the Ohio State University. She received her BA from Michigan State University and her PhD from Harvard University, and has been a faculty member at Northwestern University, the University of Buffalo, and the University of Michigan before joining the faculty at Ohio State University in 2010. 

For more information, see Crocker’s laboratory web site at http://faculty.psy.ohio-state.edu/crocker/lab/.

Doug Downey
Doug Downey
Sociology
Ohio State University

Doug Downey will spend the year trying to understand how schools influence gaps in social and behavioral skills among advantaged and disadvantaged children. 

His prior work has focused on schools’ overall role in the stratification system, comparing how inequality in cognitive skills changes when children are in school versus out (summer) as a way of understanding how schools matter. Distinct from most traditional research, he explores the counterfactual, “What would inequality look like if we did not have public schools?”

Downey is a professor of sociology at Ohio State University. He earned his PhD and MA at Indiana University and his BA at Anderson University. Two of his publications have received the Coleman Award, recognizing the best article of the year in the Sociology of Education. His research has been supported by the Spencer Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the William T. Grant Foundation, the Nellie Mae Foundation, and others.

In addition to his work on schools, Downey is broadly interested in who gets what and why. His research interests include stratification issues involving family, race, gender.

See more on Downey’s faculty website.

Tasha Fairfield
Tasha Fairfield
Political Science
London School of Economics

Tasha Fairfield will be working on a book project with Andrew Charman that aims to explicate and improve qualitative social science by drawing on expositions of Bayesian probability as “extended logic” from the natural sciences. Bayesianism is enjoying a revival in many fields, and it can provide a rigorous but as of yet underappreciated foundation for inference in qualitative research. Following Bayesian reasoning more explicitly may also enhance research transparency, which is a growing concern considering the replication crisis in social science.

Fairfield is a comparative political scientist whose empirical research focuses on democracy, inequality, and redistribution. Her book, Private Wealth and Public Revenue: Business Power and Tax Politics in Latin America (CUP 2015), won the Latin American Studies Association 2016 Donna Lee Van Cott Award for the best book on political institutions.   

Fairfield is an assistant professor at the London School of Economics. She holds a PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, an MA in Latin American studies and an MS in physics from Stanford University, and an AB in physics from Harvard University.

To learn more about her research, visit Fairfield’s personal website: www.tashafairfield.wixsite.com/home.

Graham Gottlieb
Graham Gottlieb
Public Policy
USAID

Graham Gottlieb will dedicate his fellowship year to studying approaches to deepen the integration of behavioral science and federal-level public policy. One area of focus will be a comparative study of federal laboratory bureaucracies that generate and use new knowledge to improve societal well-being. Through this comparison, he will seek to identify organizational reforms, as well as new policy mechanisms, that could increase the ease with which outside knowledge, expertise, and funding can flow to the government specifically for the creation of behaviorally-informed policy.

A second area of focus will be identifying ways that federal technology policy can be used to extend the reach of behavioral science. Increasing efforts to incorporate more behavioral science into public policy underscore the need to make sure these theories and approaches are representative of the behaviors and lives of the populations that government agencies serve, particularly historically marginalized communities.

Gottlieb is a public policy practitioner who has spent the last ten years working at the intersection of behavioral science, technology, and policy. Most recently, he worked on digital inclusion issues at the United States Agency for International Development. Prior to serving at USAID, Gottlieb created the Behavioral Science and Assessment unit at Climate Central, a leading climate communications organization. Earlier, he worked for three years in the Obama White House and engaged in research on risk perception and environmental policy at the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University. He is a graduate of Princeton University.

Ariela Gross
Ariela Gross
Law
University of Southern California

Ariela Gross will spend the year working on a book manuscript with Alejandro De La Fuente (Harvard University) comparing law, race, slavery and freedom in the Americas. The book will be a transnational and comparative study of the ways in which people of color challenged the boundaries of slavery and freedom, black and white, using Cuba, Louisiana and Virginia as case studies over several centuries. Gross and De La Fuente use the techniques of cultural-legal history, studying the interactions of ordinary people with law in their everyday lives. 

Gross is the John B. & Alice R. Sharp Professor of Law & History at the University of Southern California, and co-director of the USC Center for Law, History, and Culture. She is the author of Double Character: Slavery and Mastery in the Antebellum Southern Courtroom (Princeton 2000) and the award-winning What Blood Won’t Tell: A History of Race on Trial in America (Harvard 2008). In addition to writing about law, race and slavery in the past, she writes on race, law and the memory of slavery in contemporary law and politics, including a 2017 symposium in Law and History Review, “A Crime Against Humanity”: Slavery and The Boundaries of Legality, Past and Present. This year, her research is being supported by an American Council for Learned Societies Collaborative Research Fellowship, and she has been a Guggenheim Fellow, an NEH Huntington Research Fellow, and an ACLS Burkhardt Fellow.

Learn more at http://weblaw.usc.edu/faculty/?id=219.

John Hagan
John Hagan
Sociology
Northwestern University

John Hagan’s early work focused on subjective justice and resulted in co-authored articles on perceptions of criminal injustice in the American Sociological Review and the American Journal of Sociology. His recent research with Holly Foster, which he will continue at the Center, focuses on effects of parental incarceration on children. This work led to their organization of a White House conference. His work also focuses on international criminal law, including co-authored books on Justice in the Balkans, Darfur and the Crime of Genocide, and Iraq and the Crimes of Aggressive War. Hagan co-authored a mortality estimate of the Darfur genocide in Science and an analysis of the racial targeting of sexual violence in Darfur in the American Journal of Public Health. In a Presidential Address to the American Society of Criminology, he analyzed the role of poverty in crime. This theme is central to research on homeless youth and a book, Mean Streets. As a Guggenheim Fellow, Hagan interviewed fellow American Vietnam war resisters who migrated to Canada, resulting in the book Northern Passage. An early book, Structural Criminology, presents a power-control theory of crime. You’ll spot him if you watch closely for two tiny segments in Ava Duvernay’s documentary, 13th.

Hagan is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and Law at Northwestern University. He earned his PhD in sociology at the University of Alberta.

Phillip Hammack
Phillip Hammack
Psychology
University of California, Santa Cruz

Phillip Hammack studies sexual and gender identity diversity in social and political context. At CASBS, he will be examining the impact of community climate toward sexual and gender identity diversity on the psychological well-being of adolescents. He will be writing a series of articles based on his recently completed study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) adolescents in two distinct regions of California: the Central Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Hammack was trained as an interdisciplinary social scientist at the University of Chicago’s Committee on Human Development. His early research on youth in settings of political conflict was recognized by early career awards from the International Society of Political Psychology (ISPP), the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI), and the Society for the Study of Peace, Conflict, and Violence. Hammack has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and is author of Narrative and the Politics of Identity: The Cultural Psychology of Israeli and Palestinian Youth (Oxford, 2011), co-editor of The Story of Sexual Identity: Narrative Perspectives on the Gay and Lesbian Life Course (Oxford, 2009), and editor of the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Social Psychology and Social Justice. His research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the United States Institute of Peace, the National Science Foundation, the William T. Grant Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health.

Hammack is professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. In 2017-18, he is a William T. Grant Foundation Scholar at CASBS.

Read more about Hammack’s Politics, Culture, & Identity Lab at UCSC here.

Ron Harris
Ron Harris
Law
Tel Aviv University

Ron Harris plans to complete a book titled The Birth of the Business Corporation East and West: The Organization of Eurasian Trade 1400 – 1700. This book examines comparatively the transformation of Eurasian trade from being personally based to being based on impersonal collaboration. It examines the institutions that predated the transformation, family firms, partnerships, clans and diasporic ethnic networks, and the institution that facilitated this transformation, the joint-stock business corporation. The book analyzes the interplay between three building blocks of pre-modern societies — state, religion and the family — and business organizations. It also studies the migration and resistance to migration of institutions across civilizations.

Harris’ work is interdisciplinary, in the intersection of law, economics, and history. He is particularly interested in the interplay between legal-economic institutions and their political, economic, and legal environment and in the transformation of such institutions across time and space. During the fellowship year he will also work on a comparative project (with co-authors) on business organizational forms and contractual freedom in the U.S. and Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (with focus on small and medium size enterprises). He will begin a project on legal networks in the British Empire. His other research fields are consumer bankruptcy and credit regulation, and Israeli legal history.

Harris is a professor of legal history and immediate past dean, School of Law, Tel-Aviv University. He earned degrees in law and history from Tel Aviv University and a PhD in history from Columbia University.

Learn more on Harris’ faculty website.

Libra Hilde
Libra Hilde
History
San Jose State University

Libra Hilde will spend the year completing a book on fatherhood and slavery. ‘Our Father’: Slavery and Fatherhood in the American South examines what it meant to be an enslaved man and a father, the adaptive nature of the slave family, and how the slave community envisioned masculine duty. Despite a system that enforced neglect and limited contact with children, undermined a man’s authority and ability to protect loved ones, and broke apart families, many enslaved fathers managed to serve as caretakers and exert influence over their sons and daughters. The book also explores the sexual exploitation of slavery, how mixed-race people felt about their white fathers, and enslaved women’s reactions to children born of rape and concubinage.

Hilde’s research focuses on race and gender in the U.S. South with a particular emphasis on slavery and the Civil War. You can see her discussing her first book, Worth A Dozen Men: Women and Nursing in the Civil War South here: https://www.c-span.org/video/?424699-1/worth-dozen-men

Hilde is an associate professor of history at San Jose State University. She received her BA from the University of California, Berkeley, and her PhD from Harvard University.

Susan Holmes
Susan Holmes
Statistics and Probability
Stanford University

Susan Holmes will be working on several projects. One will be focused on the problem of reproducible research when using modern statistics. The multiplicity of choices for combining and making inferences from heterogeneous data sources poses problems in the evaluation of the results of multivariate statistical analyses. Her focus is on the development of new tools that enhance transparency and replicability of results for these types of data analyses, using the software R and computational enhancements that can be used as supplementary material in publications.

Holmes also hopes to finish a book project based on the “Thinking Matters” course she teaches at Stanford: “Breaking Codes and Finding Patterns.” This combines mathematics, computer science and statistics in the study of Code Breaking and Induction throughout history.

Holmes is professor of statistics and John Henry Samter University Fellow in Undergraduate Education at Stanford University, and was the Breiman Lecturer at NIPS 2016. She was trained in the French school of nonparametric multidimensional data analytics. She holds a PhD from University of Montpellier in France and was an associate professor of biometry at Cornell University before moving to Stanford in 1998.

Laura Kray
Laura Kray
Psychology
University of California, Berkeley

Laura Kray’s research examines the processes through which stereotypes, or beliefs about immutable differences between social groups, reinforce social hierarchy by influencing how conflict is resolved between members of social groups varying in status and power. By examining the psychological factors that influence how scarce resources are allocated, her research sheds light on the interpersonal power dynamics underlying societal-level differences between men and women.

During her fellowship year, Kray aspires to write a trade book that challenges the narrative that gender inequality in pay and career advancement reflects women’s failure to negotiate effectively. Instead, she will argue that gender inequality largely reflects societal biases that undermine women’s strengths by reinforcing erroneous stereotypes. The applied goals are to identify and remove the obstacles that prevent women and men from experiencing equal treatment and opportunity in competitive, interpersonal contexts.

Kray is a professor of leadership at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley. Kray earned a BA degree from the University of Michigan in organizational studies and a PhD in psychology from the University of Washington. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship in dispute resolution at Northwestern University and was an assistant professor at the University of Arizona before moving to Berkeley.

To learn more about Kray, visit her faculty webpage: http://facultybio.haas.berkeley.edu/faculty-list/kray-laura/.

Terra Lawson-Remer
Terra Lawson-Remer
Law
Catalyst

Terra Lawson-Remer will be working on two related projects regarding grand transformations in human production and reproduction. The first examines policy options that prioritize inter-temporal and inter-generational equity, in response to emerging currents in automation, artificial intelligence, and global trade and investment. The second explores the global implications of radical advances in biotechnology, socio-genomic research, assisted reproduction technology, and gene therapy research.

Lawson-Remer's research addresses the determinants and consequences of sustainable development, socio-economic exclusion, poverty and inequality, and human rights fulfillment within and across generations. Her most recent book, Fulfilling Economic & Social Rights (Oxford University Press), was awarded 2016 Best Book in Human Rights Scholarship by the American Political Science Association. Lawson-Remer's work has been widely published and cited in popular outlets including The New York Times, The Economist, Chronicle of Higher Education, Huffington Post, and Foreign Policy.

Lawson-Remer previously served as senior advisor at the U.S. Treasury Department during the Obama Administration, as a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and the Brookings Institution, and as assistant professor of International Affairs & Economics at The New School, where she chaired the university’s Advisory Committee on Investor Responsibility. She earned her BA in ethics, politics and economics from Yale University, her JD from New York University School of Law, and her PhD in political economy from New York University’s Law and Society Institute. In 2017-18, Lawson-Remer is a Berggruen fellow at CASBS.

You can visit her website here: www.terralr.org.

Tim Liao
Tim Liao
Sociology
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Tim Liao has recently focused on two seemingly unrelated areas of research — the evaluation and measurement of distributional inequality and the analysis of life course sequences. Distributional inequality describes how social groups may differ in occupying the same quantiles (such as the top 1%, 5%, etc.). During his fellowship year, Liao plans to bring the two strands of research together by developing a method for building and analyzing an individual’s distributional inequality profiles over the life course and across generations. This will allow scholars to investigate intragenerational and intergenerational inequality dynamics. This research will be significant to scholars not only in sociology but also in the broader social and behavioral sciences.

Liao is professor of sociology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he also is professor of statistics by courtesy and directs the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies. He earned his PhD from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He has held visiting appointments at University of Cambridge, Yale University, University College London, Luxembourg Income Study, Chinese University of Hong Kong, and University of Melbourne. He was Editor of Sociological Methodology (2009-2015) and is a Deputy Editor of Demography.

Hsienming Lien
Hsienming Lien
Economics
National Chengchi University

During his fellowship, Ming Lien will examine whether the subsidy of children’s co-payment increases children’s healthcare use, and whether the increased healthcare use improves children’s health in Taiwan. Using the Taiwan National Insurance Data, he plans to examine the following three questions: First, how does the co-payment subsidy influence the healthcare use of children, including inpatient, outpatient, and emergency care? Second, what is the relationship (complements or substitutes) between a child’s inpatient and outpatient expenditure? Finally, how large are the benefits of co-payment subsidy policy, particularly for children suffering from certain diseases (e.g. autism), or from certain income groups, or residing in certain regions?

Lien’s research employs mostly the large administrative data, including National Health Insurance data, tax records, and census data. Many of his research works involve public policies, such as designing the optimal subsidy for children’s co-payment, moral hazard issue related to disability benefits, and designing the optimal premium for National Health Insurance.

Lien is a professor of economics and director of the Taiwan Study Center at National Chengchi University. After receiving his BA and MA from the National Taiwan University, he completed his PhD in economics at Boston University. In 2017-18, Lien is the Stanford-Taiwan Social Science fellow at CASBS.

Learn more about his work here: http://www3.nccu.edu.tw/~hmlien.

John Markoff
John Markoff
Journalism
New York Times

John Markoff will use his fellowship year to continue work on a biography of Stewart Brand, the creator of the Whole Earth Catalog. The book is a social history following the path of a man who during the past five decades has created a particular Northern California mindset that has now swept the world. Markoff will also be a 2017-18 Berggruen fellow at CASBS, focusing on the impact of artificial intelligence and robotics on aging populations in the advanced world.

While at the New York Times he reported on computer security issues and wrote about technology advances such as the World Wide Web and Google’s self-driving car project. He was previously a visiting scholar at CASBS in 2014-15 while he was writing Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground between Humans and Robots (Ecco Press, 2016).

Markoff reported on Silicon Valley, computing, and technology for four decades. He retired from the New York Times at the end of 2016, and in January 2017 joined the Computer History Museum as a staff historian. He has an MA in sociology from the University of Oregon.

Read more about his work here: https://www.nytimes.com/by/john-markoff.

Carolyn Merchant
Carolyn Merchant
History
University of California, Berkeley

As a returning fellow (1977-78), Carolyn Merchant will be writing a book on “The Anthropocene and the Humanities.” Her book investigates and problematizes the complex meanings of the term Anthropocene as a short-hand concept for a series of ecological, social, and behavioral crises facing humanity in the twenty-first century and beyond. It investigates how the human sciences (exemplified by history, literature, art, philosophy, religion, ethics, and justice), as presented through the eyes of the Anthropocene, can create a new and compelling awareness of the critical implications of human impacts on the earth over the next 50 to 100 years.

Merchant is the author or editor of twelve books including The Death of Nature (HarperOne, 1990); Ecological Revolutions (University of North Carolina Press, 1989); Reinventing Eden (Routledge, 2003); Autonomous Nature (Routledge, 2015); and Spare the Birds! (Yale University Press, 2016). She has published over 100 single authored research articles. She has been a Guggenheim fellow, a fellow at the National Humanities Center, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University, and an AAAS fellow. She has presented over 350 lectures in the United States, Canada, Europe, Brazil, and Australia.

Merchant is a professor of environmental history, philosophy, and ethics at the University of California, Berkeley.

For more information, visit Merchant’s website:  https://ourenvironment.berkeley.edu/people/carolyn-merchant.

Abdul G. Noury
Political Science
New York University, Abu Dhabi

During his fellowship year, Abdul Noury will focus on legislative decision making in normal times and times of crises. He will work on voting behavior, party switching, and coalition formation in legislatures with a particular focus on the European Parliament. He will analyze how the global economic and financial crises, and the great migration crisis, shape legislative behavior.

Noury is a political economist working at the intersection of political science and economics. His past research focused on questions of ideology, nationality, and party systems within the European Union and beyond. In 2007, he co-authored the landmark book, Democratic Politics in the European Parliament (Cambridge University Press, 2007), which the American Political Science Association recognized with the Richard F. Fenno Prize for the best book published that year in the field of legislative studies. His work has appeared in various academic journals, including American Journal of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science, Journal of Comparative Economics, Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, European Journal of Political Economy, Economic Policy, Economic Letters, Legislative Studies Quarterly.

Noury is an associate professor in the division of the social sciences at New York University Abu Dhabi. He earned his BA, MA, and PhD in economics from the Université Libre de Bruxelles. In 2004-2005, he was a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley.

Sarah Ogilvie
Sarah Ogilvie
Linguistics
Stanford University

Sarah Ogilvie comes to CASBS from the Linguistics Department at Stanford University. She also serves as Director of the Stanford Dictionary Lab. While here, she will research “The Language of the iGeneration”, in particular how language reflects the influence of technology on the values, mindsets, and norms of young people born after 1995 (when the World Wide Web was introduced to broad public usage). This project is part of a larger interdisciplinary project with colleagues at Stanford University and in the United Kingdom.

Ogilvie is a linguist and lexicographer who works at the intersection of technology and the social sciences, specializing in endangered languages and their revitalization, and in dictionaries and their creation. Born in Australia and educated in Australia and at Oxford University, she taught at Cambridge University and Australian National University, and worked in the innovation lab of Amazon, before coming to Stanford University in 2014. Her books include Words of the World: A Global History of the Oxford English Dictionary (Cambridge University Press, 2013) and Keeping Languages Alive: Documentation, Pedagogy and Revitalization (Cambridge University Press, 2014). In 2017-18, Ogilvie is a Berggruen Fellow at CASBS.

You can learn more about her work and research here: https://people.stanford.edu/sogilvie/.

Ann Pendleton-Jullian
Ann Pendleton-Jullian
Architecture
Ohio State University

Working off the completion of her manuscript Design Unbound. Designing for Emergence in a WhiteWater World (MIT Press, fall 2018), which presents a new lens and set of tools for conceptualizing, investigating and acting in the contemporary world, and a series of projects that have built on the theory and practice of DesUnbound, Ann Pendleton-Jullian will spend her fellowship year developing a framework for interrogating and visualizing complex contexts and highly context contingent problems. By interweaving advances in the social sciences, information sciences, and visualization techniques with the methodologies coming from DesUnbound, and using a specific project as a vehicle to test bed concepts and methods, this framework will begin as a sketch to be filled in.

Pendleton-Jullian is an architect, writer, and educator whose work explores the interchange between architecture, landscape, culture, science, and technology within complex contexts.

Pendleton-Jullian is professor and former director of the Knowlton School of Architecture at Ohio State University, Distinguished Visiting Professor out of the President’s Office at Georgetown University, Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School of Public Policy and periodically co-teaches world building studios at USC’s School of Cinema. From 1993‐2007, she was professor of architecture at MIT. She serves on the International Panel of Experts for the Urban Redevelopment Association Singapore and is a core member of the Highlands Forums Group–a cross‐disciplinary network established in 1995 by the Secretary of Defense to examine questions of emerging interest to national defense and security.

For full CV and description of some recent publications, see www.pragmaticimagination.com.

Nathaniel Persily
Nathaniel Persily
Law
Stanford University

Nate Persily’s scholarship focuses on voting rights, political parties, campaign finance, redistricting, and election administration. His current work, for which he has been honored as an Andrew Carnegie Fellow, examines the impact of changing technology on political communication, campaigns, and election administration. During his year at CASBS, he will be writing a book expanding on the subject he explored in a recent article in the Journal of Democracy, “Can Democracy Survive the Internet?”

Persily is the James B. McClatchy Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, with appointments in the departments of political science and communication. He is coauthor of the leading election law casebook, The Law of Democracy (Foundation Press, 2016).  He has served as a special master or court-appointed expert to craft legislative districting plans for many states, as the Senior Research Director for the Presidential Commission on Election Administration, and currently on a panel of the National Academy of Sciences evaluating the state of U.S. voting technology. He received a BA/MA in political science from Yale University, a JD from Stanford University where he was president of the Stanford Law Review, and a PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley.

His website is www.persily.com and Twitter handle is @persily.

Hector Postigo
Hector Postigo
Communication
Temple University

Hector Postigo’s research focuses on the structures and processes established between technology, science, law and society. His most recent research has focused on socio-computational systems and how they shape and are shaped by social movements, video games, intellectual property, and privacy law. His research has been funded by National Science Foundation and the European Commission 7th Programme. Along with research articles in the biological sciences, communication and legal studies he has authored the book, The Digital Rights Movement: The Role of Technology in Subverting Digital Copyright (MIT Press, 2012) and is co-editor of the book Branding Privacy Through Accountability (Palgrave Press, 2012).

At CASBS, Postigo will focus on analyzing cell phone footage documenting police and state actors’ confrontations with the public, the role of that footage in shaping recent jurisprudence and its potential for shaping emerging accountability policies for police and state actors. Postigo has spent the last two years amassing a database of that footage and its attendant legal and news reporting record. Because footage is dispersed across social media, sharing platforms, court records and in news reports that database will serve as a curated public resource for research on the topic for future scholars and activists.

Postigo is associate professor of media studies and production at Temple University and, until last spring, visiting fellow at Yale School of Law’s Information Society Project. He is co-founder of Culture Digitally, a research blog for multidisciplinary research. He received his PhD in science and technology studies from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and his MS in physiology and neurobiology from the University of Connecticut.

Arati Prabhakar
Arati Prabhakar
Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics
DARPA (until 2017)

Arati Prabhakar aims to re-examine the role of technology in our society in light of the powerful new capabilities that are emerging from research today. Her work takes a fresh look at long-standing issues — how our society creates technology and how we make wise choices about its use — for this era of global, fast-paced advances.

Prabhakar served as the director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) from 2012 to 2017. She focused the agency’s efforts on rethinking complex military systems, developing the next generation of artificial intelligence and data science, and planting new research seeds in social science and biological technologies. She originally came to DARPA in 1986 as a program manager and was the founding director of the agency’s Microelectronics Technology Office. She then served as director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology from 1993 to 1997. She worked for 15 years in Silicon Valley, including a decade as a partner at U.S. Venture Partners, an early-stage venture capital firm.

Prabhakar received her PhD in applied physics and MS in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology, and her BS in electrical engineering from Texas Tech University. She is an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) fellow and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 2017-18, Prabhakar is a Berggruen fellow at CASBS.

Learn more about Prabhakar here: http://linkedin.com/in/arati-prabhakar-a366737.

Tenzin Priyadarshi
Tenzin Priyadarshi
Religion
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The Venerable Tenzin Priyadarshi is an innovative thinker, philosopher, educator and polymath monk. He serves as Director of Ethics Initiative at MIT Media Lab and is the Founding President and CEO of The Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a center dedicated to inquiry, dialogue, and education on the ethical and humane dimensions of life.

Following the catastrophic disaster caused by Tsunami in 2005, The Venerable Priyadarshi founded the Prajnopaya Foundation to develop innovative and sustainable ways to alleviate suffering in developing countries. He convened and advised a team of designers and architects from MIT, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, and Cambridge University to develop the Tsunami Safe(r) Houses: low cost, high-resistance homes for families in Sri Lanka. The foundation has been active in health care and education endeavors in India, including systematic methods to curtail tuberculosis and bring health care to rural areas. He has been interviewed by NPR, BBC, and CNN, and articles on him and his work have appeared in the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and La Republica.

During his time at CASBS, he will mostly be exploring ethical and governance frameworks around artificial intelligence. The Venerable Priyadarshi serves on the board of several academic, humanitarian, and religious organizations. He is a recipient of several recognitions and awards, including a 2013 Distinguished Alumni Award from Harvard University for his visionary contributions to humanity. In 2017-18, the Venerable Priyadarshi is a Berggruen fellow at CASBS.

Adrian Raftery
Adrian Raftery
Statistics and Probability
University of Washington

Adrian Raftery’s work will follow from a project with the United Nations aimed at putting population projections on a sound statistical footing. Population projections are widely used by governments and international organizations, researchers and the private sector. They have mostly been done deterministically, with uncertainty conveyed by subjectively chosen scenarios, an approach that has been widely criticized in recent decades.

Raftery and his team have developed a Bayesian method for probabilistic population projections that was adopted by the UN in 2015 as the basis for their official projections for all countries. Combined with new data, the new methods changed the prevailing wisdom that world population would peak in mid-century, showing instead that world population was unlikely to stabilize this century.

He will try to address new questions generated by this research, including the effects of causes of death (e.g. HIV/AIDS and smoking) that follow unique patterns, and the possible results of policy initiatives to accelerate fertility decline in high fertility countries, notably family planning programs and girl's education. He will also study its implications for climate change forecasts. More generally, Raftery will work to develop new statistical methods for the social, environmental and health sciences. Right now, he is also working on new statistical methods for Arctic sea ice prediction, and respondent-driven sampling for hard-to-reach populations.

Raftery is professor of statistics and sociology at the University of Washington. He obtained his PhD in mathematical statistics from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France.

You can visit his web page here: http://www.stat.washington.edu/raftery.

Julio Rios-Figueroa
Julio Ríos-Figueroa
Political Science
CIDE (Mexico)

Julio Ríos-Figueroa will spend the year analyzing the birth, development, and persistence of patronage networks within the Mexican Federal Judiciary in the last one hundred years. The project seeks to uncover the patronage networks created from 1917 to 1994, when the Supreme Court hand-picked lower court judges, and to gauge their effects on the performance of the Judicial Council that selects judges on merit since 1995. The broader goal is to understand what makes institutions work, what connects structure and agency, exploring the hidden bulk that lies underneath formal institutions: the norms, practices, and informal institutions that also shape individual’s behavior.

Ríos-Figueroa’s work focuses on comparative judicial institutions and the rule of law. His recent book, Constitutional Courts as Mediators (Cambridge University Press, 2016) combine insights from dialogic constitutionalism, international mediation, and comparative judicial politics into a theory on the role of constitutional courts in democratic conflict solving. The book analyzes the constitutional jurisprudence on military autonomy, the scope of military jurisdiction, and the regulation of the use of force in democracies where the armed forces are facing internal security challenges such as Colombia, Peru, and Mexico but also Israel, Turkey, and Pakistan.

Ríos-Figueroa got his PhD in politics from New York University. He is associate professor at CIDE in Mexico City.

More on his work can be found at: http://www.investigadores.cide.edu/julio.rios/.

Debra Satz
Debra Satz
Philosophy
Stanford University

Debra Satz plans to spend the year developing two projects. The first is a book examining the radical implications, and limits, of equality of opportunity as an ideal. The second — likely a series of papers — will look at the political, ethical and economic case that can be made on behalf of workplace democracy.

Satz is a political philosopher whose work focuses on the ethical dimensions of economic interactions. Her first book, Why Some Things Should Not be for Sale, (Oxford, 2010) argued for the heterogeneous nature of markets, and provided a theory to analyze what she termed “noxious” markets. Recently, she co-authored Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy and Public Policy (Cambridge, 2017) with Mike McPherson and Dan Hausman.

Satz is the Marta Sutton Weeks Professor of Philosophy, and by courtesy, professor of political science at Stanford University, where she recently concluded a seven-year stint as the senior associate dean of humanities and arts. She is also the J. Frederick and Elisabeth Brewer Weintz University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Satz holds a BA from City College of New York and a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Aaron Shaw
Aaron Shaw
Communication
Northwestern University

Aaron Shaw will study knowledge production and collaboration in online communities like Wikipedia and the Zooniverse. Some of these community projects have mobilized large, diverse groups of contributors and generated valuable, high quality public information resources. However, many attempts to do so don’t get far. The research investigates factors that shape project outcomes in terms of their growth, participation, impact, and the qualities of the information they create.

Shaw is an assistant professor of communication studies at Northwestern University as well as a faculty associate of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Together with Benjamin Mako Hill, Shaw co-founded the Community Data Science Collective, a joint research group at Northwestern University and the University of Washington, Seattle. He holds degrees from the University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University.

For more, see Shaw's website and the Community Data Science Collective wiki.

Yi-Yuan Tang
Yi-Yuan Tang
Psychology and Neuroscience
Texas Tech University

Yi-Yuan Tang studies the neuroscience of attention, creativity, decision-making, learning and body-mind interaction using psychosocial, physiological, neuroimaging, mental training and genetic analysis. He develops a novel mindfulness based preventive intervention - Integrative Body-Mind Training (IBMT) and has studied its effects in large randomized clinical trials in healthy and patient populations since 1990s. At CASBS he plans to continue his ongoing work and develop a book on the science of presence and its application in human connection, achievement, happiness and enlightenment.

Tang is a Presidential Endowed Chair in Neuroscience and professor of psychological sciences and internal medicine at Texas Tech University. He is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Sciences and American Psychological Association, and associate editor of Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. He has published eight books, such as Brain-Based Learning and Education: Principles and Practice (Academic Press, 2017), The Neuroscience of Mindfulness Meditation: How the Body and Mind Work Together to Change Our Behaviour (Springer International Publishing, 2017), and more than 290 peer-reviewed articles including “Nature Reviews Neuroscience”, “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences”, “Trends in Cognitive Sciences.” His findings are reported in the scientific journals such as Nature, Science, Nature Review Neuroscience, Neuron, and popular media including BBC, The Press Association, Reuters, TIME, New York Times and NPR. In 2017-18, Tang is the Presence-CASBS fellow at CASBS.

Learn more at Tang’s faculty page (https://www.depts.ttu.edu/psy/people/ytang/) and personal website (www.imcenter.net).

Beth Van Schaack
Beth Van Schaack
Law
Stanford University

During her fellowship, Beth Van Schaack will be thinking rigorously and creatively about how the international community can better design and implement bespoke responses to communities at acute risk of mass violence, full-blown crises like Syria, and situations emerging from episodes of bloodshed.

Van Schaack is the Leah Kaplan Visiting Professor in Human Rights at Stanford Law School — where she teaches in the areas of international human rights, international criminal law, and atrocities prevention — and a faculty fellow with the Handa Center for Human Rights & International Justice at Stanford University. Prior to returning to academia, she served as Deputy to the Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues in the Office of Global Criminal Justice of the U.S. Department of State. She continues to serve as a Special Government Expert on the State Department’s Advisory Committee on International Law. At Stanford, she has also been a Visiting Scholar with the Center for International Security and Cooperation of the Freeman Spogli Institute. Prior to her State Department appointment, Van Schaack was professor of law at Santa Clara University School of Law, where she taught and wrote in the areas of human rights, transitional justice, international criminal law, public international law, international humanitarian law, and civil procedure.

Van Schaack has also been in private practice, in the areas of commercial law, intellectual property, international law, and human rights. Prior to entering private practice, Van Schaack was Acting Executive Director and Staff Attorney with The Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) in San Francisco, and a law clerk with the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. She continues to advise a number of human rights and international justice organizations.

Van Schaack is a graduate of Stanford University and Yale University Law School.

Judy Wajcman
Judy Wajcman
Sociology
London School of Economics

Judy Wajcman will pursue her long-standing interest in the politics of technology to encompass new developments in artificial intelligence, robotics and machine learning. She will explore how the very process of classifying, operationalizing and automating specific jobs and skills is contingent upon dominant cultural conventions of time-management, speed and efficiency. By identifying the ways in which technical solutions are imprinted with the values of their designers, the research will help elaborate a more deliberative and inclusive model of technological innovation.

Wajcman is the Anthony Giddens Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics, and a visiting professor at the Oxford Internet Institute. She has published widely on the social shaping of technology, work and employment, and gender theory. Recent books include Pressed for Time: The Acceleration of Life in Digital Capitalism (Chicago, 2015) and, with N. Dodd, The Sociology of Speed: Digital, Organization, and Social Temporalities (OUP, 2017).

For more information, visit her faculty website: http://www.lse.ac.uk/sociology/whoswho/academic/wajcman.aspx

Carolyn Warner
Carolyn Warner
Political Science
Arizona State University

Carolyn Warner will spend the year working on a book project examining how and why the military and the Catholic Church have responded to cases of sexual assault and sex abuse within their institutions as they have, and the conditions under which civil authorities and elected officials do or do not hold the institutions to account. The project, mostly focused on the US, Australia and the United Kingdom, also explores whether the presumed sacredness or sacrosanct auras of the institutions play a role in how the institutions respond and whether public authorities and citizens defer to them.

Warner works in the areas of religion and politics, and corruption, with an interest in the impact of institutions and beliefs on behavior. She is the author of several books, Confessions of an Interest Group (Princeton 2000), The Best System Money Can Buy: Corruption in the European Union (Cornell 2007), and Generating Generosity: Beliefs, Institutions and Public Goods Provision in Catholicism and Islam (Cambridge, in production), and a number of articles. A recipient of major grants (US National Science Foundation; Templeton/Science of Generosity; Henry Luce Foundation; US Army Research Institute) and fellowships (Jean Monnet Fellow, Hoover Institution National Fellow), her other research has been focused on understanding the role of religion in conflict, and on corruption in the global political economy.

Warner is professor of political science in the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University. She holds a BA from the University of California San Diego, and an MA and PhD from Harvard University. For more information, go to carolynmwarner.com.

Francille Rusan Wilson
Francille Rusan Wilson
History
University of Southern California

Francille Rusan Wilson is an intellectual and labor historian whose research examines the intersections between black labor and social movements, black intellectuals, and black women’s history. Her award-winning book, The Segregated Scholars: Black Social Scientists and the Creation of Black Labor Studies, 1890-1950, is a collective biography of the world and works of 15 scholar-activists. 

While at CASBS Wilson will write a comprehensive analysis of black history movements from the nineteenth to the 21st century that both professionalized and popularized African American history. Other work in progress includes a reconceptualization of black women’s involvement in human rights and voting rights campaigns from the 15th and 19th Amendments to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Wilson is an associate professor in the departments of American Studies & Ethnicity, and history at the University of Southern California. She is serving her second term as national director of the Association of Black Women Historians. She is a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians and has been a board member of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History and the Labor and Working Class History Association. She has also served on and been president of the boards of the California African American Museum and Los Angeles Commission on the Status of Women.  Wilson is a graduate of Wellesley College, Harvard University, and earned a PhD in history from the University of Pennsylvania.

To learn more about Wilson, visit: Francille Rusan Wilson USC and Francille Rusan Wilson What Matters to Me and Why.

Ernest Wilson III
Ernest Wilson III
Communication
University of Southern California

Ernest Wilson will pull together five years of research on the competencies required for success in today’s post-industrial, digital society in a trade book on “Third Space Thinking,” a problem-solving model that complements traditional engineering and traditional business framings (www.uscthirdspace.com). His second project critiques the internal structures and external parameters of the communication field.

Wilson has written widely on global aspects of communication as a scholar and practitioner, especially the tensions between structure and agency. He co-founded the journal Information Technology and International Development, and co-edited a parallel book series, both at MIT Press. He served on the senior staff of the White House, and held positions at the US Information Agency, the World Bank, and has been an advisor to the US State Department, United Nations, the State Council of China, the Shanghai Media Group, and other bodies. He writes on ways scholarly knowledge can advance practical strategies.

A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he chairs its membership committee for communication and media, and works closely with the National Research Council, the American Academy of Engineering and other professional bodies. From 2007-2014 he was Walter H. Annenberg Chair, and Dean of the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California.

Wen-Hsin Yeh
Wen-Hsin Yeh
History
University of California, Berkeley

Wen-Hsin Yeh will work on a book about the East Asian maritime order in the 19th century. At the center of the book is an 1867 shipwreck of an American barque that occurred off the southern coast of Taiwan. None except one survived to tell the story that evolved around beachfront encounters with head-hunting aborigines. The incident led to diplomatic negotiations and state actions that eventually closed off the frontier. As the victims were never fully recovered, the episode also spurred multiple telling of the wreck in the ports and presses up and down the China coast. 

Yeh is a historian of modern China whose previous works examine subjects including the rise of China’s modern universities, the social and intellectual origins of Chinese communism, and the urban history of Shanghai. She is interested in the question of how spatial dynamics function in the construction of historical narratives. She is developing a second book project on the Chinese historian Chen Yinke (1890-1969), a medievalist who studied in Berlin in the interwar years and became a founding figure of Dunhuang Studies in China.

Yeh is Richard H. and Laurie C. Morrison Chair Professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. She also got her PhD in history at the University of California, Berkeley.

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