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Paula M. L. Moya

Paula M. L. Moya

Paula M. L. Moya

Language and Literature
Stanford University
Fellow, 2019-20 Study #30

Paula M. L. Moya is working with a team of interdisciplinary scholars and researchers on a “Reading Race” online toolkit hosted by SPARQ (Social Psychological Answers to Real-world Questions) and CCSRE (Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity) at Stanford University. This website-based digital toolkit is designed to promote racial literacy through critical engagement with multicultural literature. The project builds on interdisciplinary research and the premise that race is not a thing that people have or are, but rather actions that people do as they interact with one another and the world. Together with the “Reading Race” team, Moya aims to help teachers and students uncover, examine, and question race and power in the classroom in interesting and effective ways.

Moya’s teaching and research focus on twentieth-century and early twenty-first century literary studies, feminist theory, critical theory, narrative theory, American cultural studies, interdisciplinary approaches to race and ethnicity, and Chicanx and Latinx studies.

She is the Danily C. and Laura Louise Bell Professor of the Humanities and Professor of English, as well as the Burton J. and Deedee McMurtry University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Moya is the author of The Social Imperative: Race, Close Reading, and Contemporary Literary Criticism (Stanford UP, 2016) and Learning from Experience: Minority Identities, Multicultural Struggles (UC Press, 2002). She has co-edited three collections of original essays; Doing Race:21 Essays for the 21st Century (W.W. Norton, Inc., 2010), Identity Politics Reconsidered (Palgrave, 2006), and Reclaiming Identity: Realist Theory and the Predicament of Postmodernism (UC Press, 2000).

At Stanford, she has served as the director of the Research Institute of Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, director of the Program of Modern Thought and Literature, vice chair and also director of graduate studies of the department of English, and the director of the undergraduate program of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. She is a recipient of several fellowships and awards including the 2019 Woman of the Year in Education from the 100 Black Women-Silicon Valley and a Ford Foundation postdoctoral fellowship. At Stanford she has received the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching, the Outstanding Chicana/o Faculty Member award, a Brown Faculty fellowship, and several faculty fellowships from the Clayman Institute and the Research Institute of Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.